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Austin, TX 78703

A place to share prose and photography not in a spirit of hubris or sense of it being worthy--but as a discipline to keep me constantly improving.

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Wall Street Journal's Weekend Interview: A Case of Uncreative Destruction

Evan Baehr

Why isn't there innovation in government? Meet two entrepreneurs who wanted to help the U.S. Postal Service digitize mail. Some local postmasters liked it. Washington didn't.

In my mailbox several days ago was a bill from Time Warner Cable, a West Elm furniture catalog, a coupon for a cleaning service and letters for three previous tenants who moved out years ago. The only piece of mail I didn't throw away or put back in the box with a passive-aggressive note for the postman was the New Yorker.

Like many Americans, I have developed a careful strategy for dealing with the U.S. Postal Service: Use UPS or FedEx whenever possible. A few years ago, Evan Baehr and Will Davis decided to do something moderately more productive: They founded Outbox, a company with a digital solution to simplify—or eliminate—mailboxes across the country.

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Walt Disney: the ultimate social entrepreneur

Evan Baehr

Recently I had the privilege of spending some time with Glenn Beck over what was a rather epic dinner party, covering topics including life extension, overcoming addiction, and whether or not The Blaze would exist in heaven.  

During this visit Glenn gave a very special tour of some of his most prized artifacts and their stories. The picture above is the original map for Disney World, hand illustrated by Walt Disney himself the weekend before he went to pitch his business.  Glenn’s deep admiration for and inspiration from Walt Disney comes from what most people today think of as the lamest of the parks: EPCOT.  It turns out that Walt had a profound vision for the future and envisioned a place where those visions would be created, shared, and realized.  Unfortunately this vision was never realized at EPCOT—and that is where Beck hopes to step in to build the community that never was: a community to celebrate and realize what can be. 

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The Outbox Story goes to Washington - Congressional Testimony

Evan Baehr

Testimony prepared by my cofounder Will Davis to deliver before the House Oversight Committee on May 22, 2014.

Introduction

Over the past two years, my cofounder, Evan Baehr, and I led a team of extraordinary individuals who each took on incredible personal and financial sacrifices to launch Outbox, an innovative approach to postal mail. We had the support of world-class investors – the same early backers of Twitter, Facebook, SpaceX, and Tesla – who risked millions of dollars to fund our operations.

I assert this to highlight that there are smart and talented individuals who care deeply about our country and the problems we face as a nation. These innovators are smart, passionate, and have already brought about tremendous societal change through new technologies and business models. Yet while their advancements have benefited every person in this committee room, they are too often left out of the governing process.

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Democratizing innovation - my interview with Newt Gingrich

Evan Baehr

From a recent interview by Newt Gingrich of Will Davis and Evan Baehr about Outbox. Listen to full interview by clicking play on black button below.  

Through our experience and watching that of hundreds of people around the country we learned that with little capital and a really small team you have a chance to validate a good or service that can delight millions of people and literally transform an industry, like Uber or Lyft with transportation or AirBNB with housing.  This democratizing of innovation has been enabled by many things; a prime example is cloud computing, which lets two web developers spin up servers to support hundreds of millions of customers.  This democratization lets more people more easily pursue innovation. 

In the Outbox scenario we wanted to solve a big public problem that obviously has a relationship to the government.  And through our experience we learned that there is no Amazon Web Services for public policy. Working with government requires millions of dollars and years of effort.  Forging this requires time and money--two assets of which startups have none. 

We're back at it again--working to build another disruptive company in a highly regulated space.  Alongside this our hope is that more young people who, five years ago, may have wanted to go to law school, run for office, or work at a think tank, would set out instead to create private businesses that can delight customers in a way that improves the services that government has delivered poorly on or stood in the way of. 

 

Why you should ask stupid questions

Evan Baehr

In launching a venture in a totally new space I have had to ask a lot of stupid questions lately.  Early on I felt embarrassed; I thought: they won’t take me seriously; they will expect me to already know; they’ll think I am not smart.  But recently I’ve had a change of heart on this and developed a confidence to ask more stupid questions. 

By stupid questions I mean ones that have known answers that I might be expected to already know.  Someone throws out an acronym and I have a blank stare and ask: what does that mean? Ten seconds on google would return the basic answer.  To some, this is a stupid question—you might even say an “ignorant question.”

My change of heart came from developing a right view of “ignorance,” which I see as a "known lack of understanding."  For example, "I am ignorant of online payment protocols" means I have not spent time coming to understand them.  

I am on a lifelong quest as a learner—it excites and challenges me.  This passion comes from inspiration from Charles Eams, about whom this was written, "Sell your expertise and you have a limited repertoire. Sell your ignorance and you have an unlimited repertoire. He was selling his ignorance and his desire to learn about a subject. The journey of not knowing to knowing was his work.”

Traveling on a journey of not knowing used to be one of my greatest fears—I had an idol of wanting to appear to be "in the know."  Now I realize that was a wrong view of knowledge—and a wrong view of myself.  Along this process I committed something even worse: pretending to know, an offense widely committed that carries huge costs: you undermine the intellectual integrity of the conversation by not knowing what is being said, you deceive others about yourself, and, worst of all, you fail to learn. 

I now have the courage to “sell my ignorance” and travel with excitement and courage along a journey of not knowing. If you have not already, I hope you, too, may find that courage. 

 

 

Why you should take random meetings

Evan Baehr

A very common time management approach today goes something like this: "only answer emails from the 'most important' people that can help you advance your agenda. And only write people or meet with people when you have a specific ask.  Similarly, expect the same from others.  In sum, don't waste people's time and don't let others waste yours."  I assert this because this is exactly what a Silicon Valley billionaire told me. 

Two years ago I responded to an intriguing email from a current student of my alma matter. He wanted some advance, but we had basically nothing in common.  Fortunately, I was starting to believe in the beauty of "random," "unexpected," and possible "unfocused" meetings.  And that was one of them. We talked for an hour about such a huge range of topics about life, law, tech, doctoral programs--the entire gamut. 

Recently I got to spend an hour with this really interesting person who wanted something pretty simple--some advice about figuring out what he was passionate about.  We walked and talked; we came up with an action plan how to meet the right people and learn the right things; and I made some introductions for him.

Well, he's not figured out exactly what is next, but he's decided to do something radical in his career and dive into technology.  He emailed me to say: 

This all has been possible because you answered the emails of a total stranger -- who was really confused a few years back on how to pursue his passion.

This kind of fruit most often happens from random encounters--from connecting with people who don't exactly  score highly on your "why am I meeting with you meter."  But this encounter proved so encouraging to me--that investing in those who can give you nothing back is truly the most rewarding--and may have a role in helping him find his calling. 

Would you join me in taking random meetings? I promise it can change your life. 

Becoming an optimist again

Evan Baehr

Building an early stage startup is emotionally turbulent. The daily highs and lows are severe--the psychological amplitude includes soaring moments of excitement and deep valleys of darkness.  Scott Cannon, cofounder of app Mailbox (acquired by Dropbox), recently shared a helpful visual representation of this process with me.  

The Psychology of an Entrepreneur (Courtesy Scott Cannon)

The Psychology of an Entrepreneur (Courtesy Scott Cannon)

In the beginning we start optimistic but uninformed--we are passionate, energetic, excited to be pursuing a new idea, yet naive.  As Donald Rumsfeld describes, we don't even know the "unknown unknowns."  We have figured out only a few things (the known knowns), may have identified what is next up to figure out (the known unknowns), but largely suffer from not even knowing what we don't know yet (the unknown unknowns).  Next in our progression we start to encounter pesky "facts" or "feedback"--our product is actually illegal, not a single person will pay us for it, three companies already launched it, etc.  This leads us to the state of informed pessimism.

A real test of an entrepreneur is how he reacts at this point: does informed pessimism lead to determined curiosity and perseverance?  or does it lead to despair or finality of the idea? There is actually no right answer here: in some situations the right answer at this moment is to say: I collected the right data to learn that my hypothesis was, in fact, negated and given this I will now stop investigating this idea, product, company, etc.  

To generalize, however, too many people give up at the moment of informed pessimism--and the truly successful entrepreneur knows how to endure this very tough time of pessimism and pull through to above the x-axis to return to informed optimism.

My first goal as an entrepreneur is to become an informed pessimist as fast as possible--I want to know every reason why my idea is absolutely terrible.  Then my second goal is to use every tool I can possibly find to collect information to become an optimist again.  

How have you managed to turn this corner and become an optimist again?

Top 10 people most likely to redefine venture capital in Austin by 2020

Evan Baehr

Amid unprecedented population, housing, real estate, and startup growth, Austin is in an exciting time for early stage venture capital.  Old firms are hemorrhaging.  New firms are being founded.  From dozens of conversations over the last few years, here are my picks for the people that will redefine this industry by 2020.  No question each of these awesome people will help make Austin the best city in which to build a startup. 

Josh Baer (@joshbaer) & Bill Boebel (@billboebel) : I group this dynamic duo together as cofounders of Capital Factory, the definitive end all and be all of co-working, collaboration, and startup communities in Austin.  It is the go-to space for events, startups, and (increasingly) angel investors.  Josh and Bill are both successful serial entrepreneurs, angel investors, and some of the most generous guys in town. Few things will happen in this town without the involvement and support of these guys. 

Brian Smith (LinkedIn)- UT finance grad who navigated the elite echelons of private equity at the legendary Greenhill and Tiger investment fund.  He jumped to join Bazaar Voice two years ago for what everyone knows was quite the ride.  For his age, Brian has done more corporate finance work than anyone else I know in Austin—with higher stakes and more ups and downs.  His experience prepares him to lead (or invest in) the fasting growing tech companies in town.  

Walt Roloson (@wroloson / LinkedIn) - UT grad who navigated the elite echelons of private equity at the legendary Greenhill and Tiger. Wait, is this Brian? Nope, his alter ego and CS major Walt Roloson.  After Tiger, Walt helped lead business operations at LinkedIn in San Francisco. Now back in Austin at Impossible Labs working on a stealth venture with a well financed and very smart team.  Walt is a rare breed of a developer with great product savvy who does DCFs in his sleep - for fun.

Evan Loomis (LinkedIn) - a native Austinite, Evan logged years on Wall Street and later as cofounder of TreeHouse, the Whole Foods version of Home Depot, understanding and growing businesses of all sizes.  After building a nationwide angel investing network, he’s recently invested deeply in helping build the investor base in Austin.  With a deep network of family offices around the country, Evan’s able to bridge traditional investors to exciting, early stage deals. Like no one else I’ve met, Evan is truly in it for long term relationships—and that depth of authenticity is there from your first encounter. 

Jeff Harbach (@jeffharbach / LinkedIn) - on first meeting, it’s hard to know if you’d prefer Jeff to be your cofounder, school teacher to your kids, tennis coach, or board member.  His generosity is only matched by his curiosity—making a great combo.  Jeff is deeply embedded in the Austin tech ecosystem, a McCombs MBA and former head of the Central Texas Angel Network. He’s at the forefront of new fund formation in town and has everything needed to nail it.  

Eric Garcia (LinkedIn) - Eric is another just great guy: incredibly generous of spirit, very savvy in advising companies, and just the kind of guy you want to spent time with. Eric remains rather low profile in Austin, from which he runs Harvest Growth Capital, after a stint at Austin Ventures.  His thoughtfulness and generosity earns his way into many high growth, pre-IPO companies in San Francisco and New York.  As more high growth, Series B and later companies emerge in Austin, Eric has the LP’s to fund them. 

Josh Jones Dilworth (@joshdilworth / LinkedIn) - From slick digs above Houndstooth coffee and Uchico, Josh and his team craft and share compelling narratives for some of the most important companies in the country.  Josh is the ultimate curator of things that matter in Austin—stories worth telling.  With the hustle of a Baltimore youth, urbanity of an NYU grad, glasses of a film producer, and savvy of the best of Madison Ave, Josh makes things matter. 

Pat Noonan (@lpnoonan / LinkedIn) - a Harvard College and Stanford MBA finance guy bottled up in quantified-self meets teddy bear.  This guy is awesome.  Approaching nearly a decade of investing experience, Pat brings the experience of a big fund wit the hustle of the investor everyone wants to work with.  With deep ties to Stanford, San Francisco, and Boston, extensive deal experience, and a network to boot, Pat is well poised to launch his own fund. 

Blair Silverberg (LinkedIn) - Austin’s own Westlake High School grad Blair Silverberg is currently at historic VC fund Draper Fisher Jurvetson in San Francisco.  He’s a Stanford engineer, holds a patent on telescoping snow shoes, and founded his own consumer internet startup.  He’s learning “how the big boys do it” but my bet is that he’ll return to Austin--bringing some Sand Hill Road magic back with him.  

John Komkov (LinkedIn) - it is rumored that John has the intellectual output of 10 Stanford grads - and I think it’s true. An Austin native, John was Stanford college, in town at Austin Ventures, and is now back at Stanford for an MBA.  This town should start a movement to draft John back.   Especially refreshing about John is his long term view on Austin’s strategic assets as a city and ecosystem; it’s not about bringing Silicon Valley here, it’s about capitalizing (literally) our strengths.  I may actually use John’s return to mark my official declaration that “Austin has made it.” 

Who would you add to this list? 

 

About the author: Evan Baehr would be a VC but spent his money on Torchy's tacos and diapers for his 18 month old.  Recently he opened people's mail at Outbox and is currently working on a stealth venture.  He's currently writing a book (with Evan Loomis) about early stage startups, story telling, and raising venture capital.  Learn more here.

The idea is only the first 1%

Evan Baehr

In my short time as an entrepreneur so far, I have been amazed by the reality that ideas don't actually matter that much; it's all about the execution.  

A false view of the world holds that companies launch with a "big idea," raise money, build a team, roll out stages of that product, and begin marketing and gaining traction.  

Right thinking holds that ideas are commonplace and their execution requires millions of combinations of dozens of factors until there is a fit--between founders, investors, product, and customers.  That fit is something I have run toward but failed to find.  However, little moments of traction along that sprint at least gave me the taste of what fit--traction--alignment--even shalom--can feel like.  That alignment begins with an idea but must align the next 4,999 things on top of it. This is entrepreneurship. 

Consider these wise words from Steve Job's--a passage dear to my friend and cofounder Will Davis. 

You know, one of the things that really hurt Apple was after I left John Sculley got a very serious disease. It’s the disease of thinking that a really great idea is 90% of the work. And if you just tell all these other people “here’s this great idea,” then of course they can go off and make it happen.

And the problem with that is that there’s just a tremendous amount of craftsmanship in between a great idea and a great product. And as you evolve that great idea, it changes and grows. It never comes out like it starts because you learn a lot more as you get into the subtleties of it. And you also find there are tremendous tradeoffs that you have to make. There are just certain things you can’t make electrons do. There are certain things you can’t make plastic do. Or glass do. Or factories do. Or robots do.

Designing a product is keeping five thousand things in your brain and fitting them all together in new and different ways to get what you want. And every day you discover something new that is a new problem or a new opportunity to fit these things together a little differently. And it’s that process that is the magic.

 

Why great minds need toys

Evan Baehr

One of the greatest inventors and innovators in the last century barely went to school.  Where did he find his creative inspiration?  How did he devise world-changing machines?  He played with toys.  

Henry Ford lived a life of extraordinary impact. His company was responsible for more than 50% of the automobile production from 1911 until 1925, and along the way earned dozens of patents on everything from engines to automobile seat coverings. Yet most impressive about Ford is that he actually had no training: he had no laboratory experience, no mathematical background, and no theoretical grounding.  

As Joseph Epstein writes of Ford, "What he did have was inexhaustible energy ('No work with interest is ever hard'), perseverance ('the man who has the largest capacity for work and thought is the man who is bound to succeed'), wondrous organization powers ('I never saw Mr. Ford make anything,' a blacksmith who worked for him said. 'He was always directing'), and an insatiable desire to tinker."  Technically, Ford inventing nothing, but he tinkered with everything.  Recalling his childhood days on his father's farm, Ford said: "My toys were all tools--they still are."

Toys, tools, and tinkering were central to Ford's life and, perhaps, the fuel of his creativity.  In preparation to propose to his future wife Clara he built a special sleigh for the purpose, with steelcut wheels and cushioned shocks.  As a young married man he moved to a farm so he could build by hand a sawmill.  In his spare time he made a copy of the Otto engine, built a double cylinder engine he planned to mount on a bicycle, and built his own designs of steam engines.  Over the coming years--1896 to 1903, he built twenty-five cars--dissatisfied with them all.  Ford's life was one of relentless, creative expression and learning through curious experimentation.

In the knowledge economy, our tinkering no longer includes metal, blueprints, or physics--now it is about silicon, data, and sociology.  For many of us (e.g. those who do not write software), our tinkering has been relegated to introducing a new component to our system of coordinated wireless network devices to livestream a 1080p film to a smart TV, while simultaneously posting comments to twitter, facebook, and ephemerally snapchat--in case we want to say something "crazy."  This is a process we used to call:  "watching a movie and talking with a friend."  Our tools are mostly software and our tinkering is--usually--just about getting things to connect to each other (c.f. IFFT).  Amidst a sea of apps and APIs, I am looking for some real tools--something I can touch, use, and maybe even be injured by. 

When sitting with this thirst, I discovered a veritable lemonade of satisfaction for my new interest: Kevin Kelly's Cool Tools, A Catalog of Possibilities.  It's origin is heartwarming: Kevin wanted to put together the ultimate box of tools for his son to take with him to college; he started with a box of a few dozen items... and years later ended up with a collection of literally thousands of items. 

Kelly's inspiration came in part from teh Whole Earth Catalogs, about which Kelly writes, "

The paper books were magical. There is something very powerful at work on large pages of a book. Your brain begins to make naturally associations between tools in a way that it doesn’t on small screens. The juxtapositions of diverse items on the page prods the reader to weave relationships between them, connecting ideas that once seemed far apart. The large real estate of the page opens up the mind, making you more receptive to patterns found in related tools.

Screenshot 2014-01-08 01.03.40.png

I had no idea that a catalog could pull this off--but spend an hour flipping through these pages and you'll actually be learning.  When perusing Skymall my reaction is, "who would buy that?" When perusing Cool Tools my reaction is: "I had no idea!  I want to try that!"

My reading and purchasing a few items from this book marks the beginning of my journey to find a few cool tools that that let me tinker, which inspires me to create, which enables me to live. Perhaps in Kelly's own foreword I find a beautiful and inspiring case for this approach: "I assembled this collection so that my three children would see a thousand other possibilities in life that are opened when you pick up a tool."

So: what tool are you going to pickup? I'm starting by picking up a pencil and learning to draw from Betty Edwards. 


When you store things digitally, you actually lose them

Evan Baehr

Over the last twenty four hours I read Nicholas Carr’s The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains, which left me concerned that, despite degrees from Harvard, Princeton, and Yale, I am on a path toward a brain that doesn’t work.

The idea. Marshall McLuhan, author of Understanding Media and partly the inspiring philosophy of Carr’s work, argues that our tools end up numbing whatever part of our body they “amplify.” The power loom left weavers without manual dexterity.  The mechanical plows left farmers with no tactile understanding of soil.  Carr explores the next application of this thesis: if computers and the internet are meant to amplify the brain, do they also numb it?

Previous inventions–the book and the calculator–enabled greater human understanding and materially advanced the cause of mankind, Carr argues.   With the book, humans were able to communicate (write) and understand (read) across time and place, eliminating the need to obtain a rare physical copy or, even worse, find someone to recite it.   With the calculator, students could stop spending hours on long division and instead devote time to calculus.  But the internet is different: it enables us to outsource our brains - or at least the entire set of facts, images, and stories – to external storage.  Although this outsourcing might seem efficient because it allows humans to focus on higher order thinking (e.g. combining the images, telling narratives with the facts, etc.), outsourcing actually robs us of the very act that enables us to do the higher order thinking in the first place: the neural process of committing “data” from short term memory to long term memory.  While remembering things seems unnecessary and even irrational in an age of cloud storage, failing to do so actually leaves us incapable of doing anything meaningful with that memory.

Hitting home.  I seek out technology for nearly everything–especially tasks related to storing and recalling data.  I love that ICQ logs my full chat histories.  I love that Evernote records the lectures I attend.  And I love that Gmail keeps every email–forever.  This gives me a sense of freedom–of insurance.  I can carry on thinking about “things that matter” while leaving the storage and recall of facts to my devices.  And we might image a world in which a full-time Siri listens and acts for us: in a meeting I mention making an email introduction to someone and Siri does it… or I attend a talk on transcendentalism and Siri adds the wiki article to my evernote.  This technology assures me that any fact, detail, or even memory is at the tip of my fingertips.   But my realization is that I am doing myself a huge disservice by not doing the hard work of committing things to memory.  The concern isn’t: is evernote backed up (e.g. might I lose it)?  The concern is: by digitally “storing it” have I actually “lost it”?  Or perhaps if I digitally store it, I have never actually “had it”?

Getting help.  Carr uncovers a gem from the sixteenth century that got me thinking.  The Dutch humanist Desiderius Erasmus taught his students to look for “occurrences of striking words, archaic or novel diction, brilliant flashes of style, adages, examples, and pithy remarks worth memorizing” and to collect them in a notebook organized by subject.  This process of transcription and memorizing was not a means of storage but rather “the first step in a process of synthesis, a process that led to a deeper and more personal understanding of one’s reading.”  The Roman Seneca said it beautifully:

We should imitate bees and we should keep in separate compartments whatever we have collected from our diverse reading, for things conserved separately keep better.  Then, diligently applying all the resources of our native talent, we should mingle all the various nectars we have tasted, and then turn them into a single sweet substance, in such a way that, even if it is apparent where it originated, it appears quite different from what it was in its original state.

This counsel manifested in the 17th century tradition of “commonplaces,” a scrapbook of sorts with clippings and transcribed passages, quotations, and memories.  As one linguistics professor said, “a gentleman’s commonplace book” served “both as a vehicle for and chronicle of his own intellectual development.”  This was not just our ancestors’ CTRL+C.  Rather the act of copying and organizing the content created the mental schema that enabled understanding. On this William James went so far as to say: “the art of remembering is the art of thinking.”  We might ask: if we are not remembering, are we not thinking?

Evernote is not a commonplace.  I was tempted to laugh at our ancestors; after all today I can capture terabytes of data about my daily experience – an HD video camera can record 1080p and 4 channel sound, recognize every face I encounter, transcribe every word I hear, and soon enough perform tasks and research passively, without my even thinking about it.  And that’s the point: today’s evernote and tomorrow’s 24/7 life capturing devices rob us of the act of remembering and, per James, the act of thinking.

The commonplace required manual transcription–a deliberate and time-intensive act that had two critical side effects.  First, handwriting requires mental recitation of an idea and creates time to process the idea.  Today I can “add to my evernote” and entire novel in one second.   Second, the commonplace was a book with a limited number of pages, which forced prioritization of ideas–only the ones that mattered made the cut.  Yet today I have no hesitation to record the audio of every lecture I attend and to save all 3,000 photos from my family vacation.

I am on a hunt for a modern commonplace–yes a book of sorts, but also a physical place and even an attitude.  Amidst the tumultuous sea of tweets, RSS feeds, and email, I am searching for a way to discover, understand, and remember basic truths.  The more places I visit, people I meet, and degrees I obtain, the more I appreciate the beauty and simplicity of a single idea, presented cogently.  And it is these basic ideas that I am trying to bring together so that they might mingle and become a “single sweet substance.”

So, what is your commonplace?  Have you committed things to memory?  How did it go? Any suggestions for me?

Note: nearly all of the quotations above are from The Shallows and are not correctly attributed. I am not intending to reflect those quotations as my own research.  In fact, it is clear to me now that I may not even have the capacity to do this kind of research!

Design Thinking: six ways to get started

Evan Baehr

I first learned about design thinking during a Harvard-sponsored trip to Silicon Valley where we spent an afternoon at IDEO,  the iconic design firm involved in many of the most famous designs in the last 25 years, including the mouse, the PalmPilot, and many of Apple’s flagship products. There was something refreshing about the attitude of the designers, the culture of the firm, and even the design of their workspace. The firm is filled with “t-shaped people”– experts in one trade but generalists in all. A team of anthropologists, structural engineers, and graphic artists can sit down, be given an outrageously difficult problem, and hours and hundreds of Post-it notes later, they often have a remarkably elegant solution. This was something I wanted to learn more about.

Cofounding a new venture nine months ago has provided an opportunity to infuse design thinking into a technology company from the beginning. Below are a few things we’ve tried along the way.  If you are curious about design thinking, just pick one and get started!

1. Learn what it’s all about: the best place to learn about design thinking is Stanford’s bootcamp bootleg found here. This 100 page bootleg document is the best summary I have found and was created by probably the institutional leader in the field: the Stanford d.school.  Empathize. Define.  Ideate.  Prototype.  Test.  That’s it!

2. Practice thinking visually: A key component to design thinking is expressing  ideas visually. Don’t be afraid if you are a bad drawer!  Just start!  For example, I used to track all of my job candidates in Microsoft Excel. Recently, I wrote all the candidates names out on small Post-it notes and lined them up on the wall. It was amazing how often I ended up thinking about these people just by glancing over at the wall.  So think about it this way: the more content you write out or even print out and put on the wall or the whiteboard, the larger screen size you have!  Moreover, actively mapping out ideas or people in a 2D,  flexible space, enables your mind to better organize and understand the data.  Dan Roam’s The Back of the Napkin is a helpful place to start to learn how to draw basic diagrams and illustration.  Or check out some additional training materials around “visual note taking” from Dave Gray, Sunnibrown’s Visual Note Taking 101, and Austin Kleon’s Ideas Worth Stealing.

3. Design your space: We have tried to maximize the visual whitespace in our office so that as many square inches are as functional as possible. We have big glass doors that work for posted notes and whiteboard markers, we painted a 10′ by 30′  wall in IdeaPaint (a paintable white board – expensive but works well), covered 3 other walls with foamcore (a lightweight foam poster product sold in big sheets at design stores, usually about $15 for a 4′x8′ sheet),  and gave everyone awesome white glass desks from Ikea so their workspace is writeable! 

4. Choose your tools: Go ahead and go to Amazon right now and order a box of fine point sharpie markers (black and red), and small Post-it notes.   Make a habit of always carrying them with you. For example, I was in a bar last week and ended up mapping out someone’s idea with about 20 posted notes on the table. Yes, it was a bit odd, but we had a good time doing it.   I also have come to love my ActionMethod Journal, with tearable pages, a to-do list, and nice rubber cover.

5. Practice as a team:  friends at a design-heavy venture accelerator in Austin called Thinktiv suggested a fantastic book called Gamestorming: A Playbook for Innovators, Rulebreakers, and Changemakers, which lays out a few dozen really fun, engaging games that a team can play in order to solve difficult problems.

6. Make friends with designers: Austin  is lucky to have  a very rich design ecosystem, created in part by frog design and sustained by folks like Jon Kolko and his Austin Center for Design and Dean Kakridas.  I have made a point to meet these designers, learn how they work, and find small ways to engage them in our company’s work. For example, we ran a full-day design thinking workshop around the future of postal communication with a half dozen designers, our team, and a few volunteers from craigslist; over eight hours we came up with a few hundred ideas.

During my first encounter with design thinking I was a bit intimidated: I was not an artist, I didn’t wear cool black glasses,  I had never been trained in this…. But,  the great news is that design thinking is actually accessible to anyone and has the power to bring big ideas and creativity into any organization.

Chick-fil-A and the business of story listening

Evan Baehr

Consumer-facing businesses have a unique opportunity to touch millions of real lives in a personal way every day. Put on your consumer hat for a minute and think through your day: the coffee shop barrista, the cashier at McDonalds, the sales associate at Target, the attendant at the gas station, the waiter at your restaurant, and on and on. Indeed we have conversations with several people every day–probably dozens a month–in the context of retail businesses. Retail employees are amazingly prevalent in our lives – a prevalence surpassed only by our friends and family members. That consumers spend so much time and even emotional energy interacting with employees creates a real opportunity for businesses to go beyond traditional roles of sales and customer service.


A few weeks ago I had the privilege to visit Chick-fil-A headquarters in Atlanta, Georgia, for an all-day tour and series of discussion with the company leadership.  Based on my conversations, here’s my impression of how Chick-fil-A sees its business: 1,600 community spaces where 7+ million Americans spend time with their friends and family… and to these spaces their customers bring their stories, their needs, and their hopes. Although it is great chicken sandwiches and a welcoming restaurant that get people in the door, once customers show up employees have an opportunity–albeit brief–for real interaction. Yes there is customer service: taking orders, making change, delivering food. However, there’s more. Chick-fil-A wants to serve the full range of needs of its customers. So when an elderly woman walks in the door, the posture isn’t just: “what value meal can I serve this woman?” It is also: “What is this woman’s story?” and “In my few minutes of interaction, how can I somehow connect with and empower this woman?”

So given these powerful personal stories of individual customers, what can Chick-Fil-A employees really DO?  Yes, it is unreasonable to be the personal social worker for every customer–employees can’t leave work to go run errands for an elderly person.  But let’s set aside zero sum thinking and explore ways that employees really can serve customers in realistic ways.

Consider Martha–a 73 year old woman who every day visits her husband in a senior home, where he lives out his final years while suffering from Alzheimer’s disease.  Today is an ordinary Tuesday.  After her morning coffee and toast, Martha drives to visit her husband.  But on this Tuesday, after 2 years of visiting every day, her husband doesn’t recognize her.  Imagine: the love of your life–your best friend–no longer knows who you are.  That is a story.  That is an experience.  This is no ordinary Tuesday.

Consider the rest of her day.  She leaves an hour later with her world changed.  She drives to Chick-Fil-A to eat lunch.  Over the next 45 minutes, she will sit quietly, eating her sandwich and thinking about her morning. At that very moment what does Martha need?  Errands run? No.  Financial support?  No.  Educational opportunities? No. Martha needs empathy – she needs her story to be known – she needs to have an opportunity to tell her story – she needs someone to listen to her story.

Giving someone the opportunity to tell their story is a precious gift.  On its surface it seems silly.  You might say: that some nice guy sits and listens to an old woman talk about her husband doesn’t do anything–he’s still dying, she’s still sad–all you’ve done is feel good about yourself.  But think of it this way: remember back to a time when you first told someone something–”I love you,” “I’m pregnant,” “our dad died.”  Verbalizing an observation or experience brings reality to it in a way that simply keeping it in your memory does not.  Oral story telling is a performative experience for the listener and the teller.  It enables the teller to process, communicate, and share her experience, in a way that solitary reflection does not. And perhaps most importantly, that someone wants to be your audience says that your story matters–that it is worth hearing and worth telling.  Having an audience communicates “you matter.”   And the act of communicating that story forces a rational, psychological, and emotional processing of the experience for the story teller.  Indeed, story telling is about much more than communicating information; if employee Jim asks Martha “How are you?” and Martha begins to share her story, this is not an act of transferring information; Jim would not say, “Can you drop me an email on that?”  Rather, story telling–or rather story listening–is an opportunity to show someone that they matter. Giving someone your focused attention, listening attentively, and being emotionally present in the conversation together authentically say “I care about you.”

The reality is that most people have stories to tell.  The tragedy is that no one is there to listen–no one even bothers to ask.  So we are left feeling that our stories don’t matter–that we don’t matter.  Because most people interact with retail business several times a day, consumer-facing businesses have an opportunity to enable story telling on a massive scale. Enabling millions of people to tell their story will cause fairly profound social change (whether decreased depression and suicide, greater self-actualization, increased confidence and optimism, etc.).  In addition to serving customers’ material needs, businesses oriented this way might begin to serve customers’ social, psychological, and emotional needs.

To begin exploring the merits of this proposal, try out your hand at story listening.  As you navigate your day or show up at a conference, try to see how many stories you can enable to be told.  Practice asking good questions.  Practice creating little moments of authenticity and trust in which someone feels able to share openly.  Find the person sitting alone in the lunchroom or standing in the corner during the meet and great and go listen to their story. Go give someone an audience–you might be reminding someone that they matter – something we all need to hear from time to time..

Things I’m still thinking about:

  • How can we train and equip employees to be “story listeners”?
  • How can we measure the impact and relevance of story telling?
  • Are there story listening “best practices”?
  • Need we be able to do more than listen?  If the story teller has real needs (e.g. addiction, abuse, employment, etc.), should we be able to equip or at least refer them?
  • Historically: who in society serves as story listeners?  Pastors? Coworkers? Psychiatrists?  Is it odd that business would have to serve this role?
  • Maybe we’re really just talking about people being listeners… and they have to do so at a business because that is simply where they are during the day. So perhaps a business-led listening movement is ill-fated.